Inside the Cargill Family

Inside the Cargill Family

It’s the largest commodities trader in the world, employs 155,000 people, and operates around the globe in a wide range of industries. Sales and other revenues totaled US$114 billion in fiscal year 2018, making it the largest privately held U.S. company by revenue, according to Forbes.

Chances are, you’ve had a taste of one of its products at some point in your day. An egg from McDonald’s. Or a Coke, or a beer. Or anything salted, sweetened, preserved, emulsified, or with added texture.

Candy bars, pretzels, canned soup, yogurts, ice cream – all include food additives that probably come from the company’s line of food ingredients – a business that, on its own, was worth $50 billion in 2015.

And there’s a decent chance you’ve never heard of it.

The company – and the family business – is Cargill.

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Inside the Samsung empire

Inside the Samsung empire

It was late in 2014 – and a scenario many business families fear.

Samsung chairman Lee Kun-hee, the 72-year-old son of the company’s founder, had suffered a heart attack, leaving the family scrambling to address a leadership transition far sooner than expected.

One of the world’s largest companies – a $400 billion conglomerate including not just smartphones and electronics, but also shipbuilding, hotels and resorts, construction, advertising and even life insurance – suddenly faced questions about who would take over, steady the ship, and lead the company forward.

And this was no normal business family transition.

The Lee family would need to navigate its leadership change delicately. South Korean tradition dictates that no heir can take over the business until the patriarch has died. The problem? Kun-hee wasn’t dead, but his health problems left him incapacitated and unable to lead the company.

So slowly, re-writing the script as they went, the Lee family transitioned increased responsibilities to Kun-hee’s only son, Lee Jae-yong, who was appointed Vice Chairman of Samsung Electronics.

But that issue would soon pale in comparison to what came next.

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Financial assistance: rising tides lift all boats

Financial assistance: rising tides lift all boats

Valerie WHITTINGHAM Pringle ’71 is one of the most recognized faces in Canadian broadcasting, particularly since she spent almost a decade sitting in the co-anchor chair at CTV’s Canada AM morning show. She co-hosted coverage of the 1994 Lillehammer Winter Olympics and was chosen as one of the Famous 50 Faces of 50 Years of Canadian Television in 2002.

Ms. Pringle’s extraordinary journey began as a BSS student and Financial Assistance program participant, and she remains grateful for the support she received.

“I think people who give to student assistance have a very big heart and a very big vision because they know what a difference it can make in a life,” says Ms. Pringle. “A massive difference, all the difference in the world.”

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Canada’s liberal values: a happy contrast to global uncertainty

Isolationism, nativism, fear and uncertainty have characterized several global events over the past year, including Donald Trump’s recent election to the highest office in the United States and Britain’s exit from the European Union. As the world tries to grapple with these outcomes, The Economist recently pointed to a “happy contrast”: Canada.

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Polish off the rust

Polish off the rust

The Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus has two huge projects underway, set to be completed in 2017: a $375 million medical school, and a $267 million children’s hospital. The campus will employ 20,000 people by 2020. Here’s what’s striking: in the 1950s, Bethlehem Steel, the second largest steelmaker in the United States, employed 20,000 people in Buffalo. The company went bankrupt in 2001.

The shift is representative of the rustbelt region as a whole. Not that long ago, industrial manufacturing was what made these cities great. But job outsourcing, manufacturing moving west, and increased automation almost ground the region to a halt. From the 1970s through the early 2000s, cities including Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit and Pittsburgh lost over 40 per cent of their populations. 

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Live and Learn: The irresistible pull of education in Canada

Live and Learn: The irresistible pull of education in Canada

Bukky Boyo immigrated to Canada from Nigeria with her husband and three daughters in the spring of 2001. “We came to Canada because of the girls – we wanted them to have a good Canadian education,” Mrs. Boyo says. 

She soon began looking for a school for her eldest daughter, Alero. The application deadline for the upcoming school year at BSS had already passed. But it had one spot left in Boarding.

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